kubernetes

Using BLT with Config Split outside Acquia Cloud or Pantheon Hosting

I am currently building a Drupal 8 application which is running outside Acquia Cloud, and I noticed there are a few 'magic' settings I'm used to working on Acquia Cloud which don't work if you aren't inside an Acquia or Pantheon environment; most notably, the automatic Configuration Split settings choice (for environments like local, dev, and prod) don't work if you're in a custom hosting environment.

You have to basically reset the settings BLT provides, and tell Drupal which config split should be active based on your own logic. In my case, I have a site which only has a local, ci, and prod environment. To override the settings defined in BLT's included config.settings.php file, I created a config.settings.php file in my site in the path docroot/sites/settings/config.settings.php, and I put in the following contents:

Fixing '503 Service Unavailable' and 'Endpoints not available' for Traefik Ingress in Kubernetes

In a Kubernetes cluster I'm building, I was quite puzzled when setting up Ingress for one of my applications—in this case, Jenkins.

I had created a Deployment for Jenkins (in the jenkins namespace), and an associated Service, which exposed port 80 on a ClusterIP. Then I added an Ingress resource which directed the URL jenkins.example.com at the jenkins Service on port 80.

Inspecting both the Service and Ingress resource with kubectl get svc -n jenkins and kubectl get ingress -n jenkins, respectively, showed everything seemed to be configured correctly:

AnsibleFest 2018 is a Wrap! Slides from my presentation and notes

AnsibleFest 2018 is in the books, and it was a great conference! I was able to attend the 'Contributors Summit' in Austin on Monday, and remotely Thursday, and I learned quite a bit! I also presented Make your Ansible playbooks maintainable, flexible, and scalable on both days of the conference. Slides from that session are available below, but you'll have to wait for the actual video to be uploaded to see the fun little gimmick I added for the live presentation 🙃.

Kubernetes' Complexity

Over the past month, I started rebuilding the Raspberry Pi Dramble project using Kubernetes instead of installing and configuring the LEMP stack directly on nodes via Ansible (track GitHub issues here). Along the way, I've hit tons of minor issues with the installation, and I wanted to document some of the things I think turn people away from Kubernetes early in the learning process. Kubernetes is definitely not the answer to all application hosting problems, but it is a great fit for some, and it would be a shame for someone who could really benefit from Kubernetes to be stumped and turn to some other solution that costs more in time, money, or maintenance!

Raspberry Pi Dramble cluster running Kubernetes with Green LEDs

Reintroducing the sanity of CM to container management

Recently, Ansible introduced Ansible Container, a tool that builds and orchestrates Docker containers.

While tools that build and orchestrate Docker containers are a dime a dozen these days (seriously... Kubernetes, Mesos, Rancher, Fleet, Swarm, Deis, Kontena, Flynn, Serf, Clocker, Paz, Docker 1.12+ built-in, not to mention dozens of PaaSes), many are built in the weirdly-isolated world of "I only manage containers, and don't manage other infrastructure tasks."

The cool thing about using Ansible to do your container builds and orchestration is that Ansible can also do your networking configuration. And your infrastructure provisioning. And your legacy infrastructure configuration. And on top of that, Ansible is, IMO, the best-in-class configuration management tool—easy for developers and sysadmins to learn and use effectively, and as efficient/terse as (but much more powerful than) shell scripts.

From Ansible Container's own README:

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