Recent Blog Posts

Watch out if composer update keeps replacing a dependency

Recently, while working on the codebase for this very site, I tried running composer update to upgrade from Drupal 8.8.4 to 8.8.5. Apparently I did this at just the wrong time, as there was an issue with Drupal's dependencies in 8.9.x-dev which caused it to be selected as the upgrade candidate, and the default drupal/core-recommended Composer setting was to allow dev stability, so my site got updated to 8.9.x-dev, which was a bit of a surprise.

"No worries," I thought, "I use git, so I'm protected!" A git reset later, then change my composer.json to use "minimum-stability": "stable", and all is well with the world, right?

Well, no. You see, the problem is Drupal 8.9.x changed from an abandoned package, zendframework/zend-diactoros, to a new package, laminas/laminas-diactoros, that replaces the abandoned package.

The FINAL Drupal 7 to 8 migration live stream - May 19

May 19 Update: It was a total success, yay! This site is now running Drupal 8.

Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 live migration - FINAL EPISODE May 19 at 11 am ET

Over 100 days in, the big day has finally arrived—it's time to upgrade this website from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8! The entire process has been documented, one hour at a time, in my 'Drupal 7 to 8' live streams. Visit that link to view all the previous episodes, from setting up a new Drupal codebase, to running the first test drush migrate-upgrade command, to upgrading this site's theme from PHPtemplate in Drupal 7 to Twig in Drupal 8.

Some of the highlights:

10,000 Kubernetes Pods for 10,000 Subscribers

It started with a tweet, how did it end up like this?

I've had a YouTube channel since 2006—back when YouTube was a plucky upstart battling against Google Video (not Google Videos) and Vimeo. I started livestreaming a couple months ago on a whim, and since that time I've gained more subscribers than I had gained between 2006-2020!

So it seems fitting that I find some nerdy way to celebrate. After all, if Coline Furze can celebrate his milestones with ridiculous fireworks displays, I can do ... something?

Getting colorized output from Molecule and Ansible on GitHub Actions for CI

For many new Ansible-based projects, I build my tests in Molecule, so I can easily run them locally or in CI. I also started using GitHub Actions for many of my new Ansible projects, just because it's so easy to get started and integrate with GitHub repositories.

I'm actually going to talk about this strategy in my next Ansible 101 live stream, covering Testing Ansible playbooks with Molecule and GitHub Actions CI, but I also wanted to highlight one thing that helps me when reviewing or observing playbook and molecule output, and that's color.

By default, in an interactive terminal session, Ansible colorizes its output so failures get 'red' color, good things / ok gets 'green', and changes get 'yellow-ish'. Also, warnings get a magenta color, which flags them well so you can go and fix them as soon as possible (that's one core principle I advocate to make your playbooks maintainable and scalable).

Raspberry Pi Cluster Episode 2 - Setting up the Cluster

This post is based on one of the videos in my series on Raspberry Pi Clustering, and I'm posting the video + transcript to my blog so you can follow along even if you don't enjoy sitting through a video :)

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In the first episode, I talked about how and why I build Raspberry Pi clusters.

I mentioned my Raspberry Pi Dramble cluster, and how it's evolved over the past five years.