Recent Blog Posts

The Apple Card is entirely form over function

So the title is a little clickbaity. Apple Card is not just the physical card you get in the mail when you sign up for an Apple Card.

I get it. And I also believe the physical titanium Apple Card is a marvel of engineering. Kudos to the metallurgists and designers who produced it—it would easily make for a durable and beautiful display piece on the history of monetary transfer.

Apple Card - Jeff Geerling - Front hero shot

The card feels great in your hand. It has a beautiful white finish. The letter and logo detail is impeccable.

Apple Card - Apple logo detail

The way the magstripe seamlessly integrates into the titanium structure of the card is beautiful, and probably required some extremely precise machining.

How to add integration tests to an Ansible collection with Molecule

Note: Ansible Collections are currently in tech preview. The details of this blog post may be outdated by the time you read this, though I will try to keep things updated if possible.

Ansible 2.8 and 2.9 introduced a new type of Ansible content, a 'Collection'. Collections are still in tech preview state, so things are prone to change.

Ansible Collections must be in a very specific path, like {...}/ansible_collections/{namespace}/{collection}/

You have to make sure your collection is in that specific path—with an empty directory named ansible_collections, then a directory for the namespace, and finally a directory for the collection itself. I opened an issue in the Ansible issue queue asking if ansible-test can allow running tests in an arbitrary collection directory, and for Molecule itself, there's more of a 'meta' issue, Molecule and Ansible Collections.

Discovering whether an Ansible component is 'core' or 'community'

As you get deeper into your journey using Ansible, you might start filing issues on GitHub, chatting in #ansible on Freenode IRC, or otherwise interacting more with the Ansible community. Because the Ansible community has grown tremendously over the years—and as Ansible has been subsumed by Red Hat, which has various support plans for Ansible—there's been a greater distinction between parts of Ansible that are 'core' (e.g. maintained by the Ansible Engineering Team) and those that are not.

When everything works, and when you're living in a world where security and compliance requirements are fairly free, you would never even care about the support for Ansible components (modules, plugins, filters, Galaxy content). But if something goes wrong, or if there are security or compliance concerns, it is important to be able to figure out what's core, what's 'certified' by Red Hat, and what's not.

A Drupal Operator for Kubernetes with the Ansible Operator SDK

Kubernetes is taking over the world of infrastructure management, at least for larger-scale operations, and best practices have started to solidify. One of those best practices is the cultivation of Custom Resource Definitions (CRDs) to describe your applications in a Kubernetes-native way, and Operators to manage your the Custom Resources running on your Kubernetes clusters.

In the Drupal community, Kubernetes uptake has been somewhat slow, but is on the rise. Just like with Docker adoption for local development, the tooling and documentation has been slowly percolating. For example, Tess Flynn from TEN7 has been boldly going where no one has gone before (oops, wrong scifi series!) using the Force to promote Drupal usage in a Kubernetes environment.

How to add integration tests to an Ansible Collection with ansible-test

Note: Ansible Collections are currently in tech preview. The details of this blog post may be outdated by the time you read this, though I will try to keep things updated if possible.

Ansible 2.8 and 2.9 introduced a new type of Ansible content, a 'Collection'. Collections are still in tech preview state, so things are prone to change, but one thing that the Ansible team has been working on is improving ansible-test to be able to test modules, plugins, and roles in Collections (previously it was only used for testing Ansible core).

ansible-test currently requires your Collection be in a very specific path, either:

Make your Ansible playbooks flexible, maintainable, and scalable - AnsibleFest Austin 2018 Presentation

Last year, at AnsibleFest Austin 2018, I presented Make your Ansible playbooks flexible, maintainable, and scalable. All the sessions at AnsibleFest were recorded, and I thought I'd be doubly safe since I presented my session on both days of AnsibleFest! Alas, due to some technical glitch, all the session recordings were lost, and so the only recordings available online today are those which were re-recorded by presenters.

As life happened... re-recording the session was put on the back burner. And after many months, I started to forget the structure of the presentation (I haven't given it since AnsibleFest), so I figured I might never get around to re-recording it at home.

Luckily, though, when I was running through Final Cut Pro to archive the previous years' completed projects, I found a practice recording of the session from the week before AnsibleFest. It was thankfully pretty good, and only needed a few slight edits:

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