Recent Blog Posts

Flashing a Raspberry Pi Compute Module on macOS with usbboot

I recently got to play around with a Turing Pi, which uses Raspberry Pi Compute Modules to build a cluster of up to 7 Raspberry Pi nodes.

Turing Pi Raspberry Pi 7 nodes of Compute Modules

Interested in learning more about building a Turing Pi cluster? Subscribe to my YouTube channel—I'm going to be posting a series on the Turing Pi and Rasbperry Pi clustering in the next few weeks!

You can buy Compute Modules with or without onboard eMMC memory. If you don't have memory, you can attach a microSD card and boot from it, just like you would on any Raspberry Pi model B or model A. But if you have the eMMC memory, it's nice to be able to 'flash' that memory with an OS, so the compute module uses the onboard storage and doesn't require a separate boot device (either microSD card or USB disk).

Presenting on Drupal Dev Environments and Migrations at CMS Philly on May 1st

Friend and former colleague Chris Urban and I will be presenting the results of the 2020 Drupal Local Development Survey at CMS Philly—which is now a virtual event—on May 1st. You can find more information about the session here: 2020 Developer Tool Survey Results. I'll also be posting the survey results on this blog soon after.

Chris also coaxed me into talking about my ongoing Drupal 7 to 8 migration saga in a separate session, so if you've missed the first 13 live stream episodes, check out the session How I'm migrating JeffGeerling.com from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 to get caught up—then subscribe to my YouTube channel to see how it all ends 🤪.

It remains to be seen whether Chris and I will be wearing Hawaiian shirts during the session:

Preserving the Web - JJJCL and 'Duel' video

About two decades ago, I built a website for the National Junior Classical League's individual website competition. This website, JJJCL, won a 2nd place award for how blindingly brilliant it was. I kept the site puttering along as I moved my static HTML site content from 'homepage.mac.com' to a personal bare metal webserver I ran for a few years, then eventually moved it to the server where I hosted this site (jeffgeerling.com).

But along the transition of this site from Drupal 6 to 7, it seems like that site dropped off the face of the Internet. And with it, part of my (embarrassing, design-wise? sure) history on the web. Luckily, I have archives of practically everything I've ever created, so today I'm happy to announce I have restored that part of my personal history to the Internet, along with another purpose-built static HTML site I built in Apple's short-lived iTools HomePage:

Donating $1 per like (matched to $3) to the Drupal Association

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Like many of you, my life has changed because of open source software. Drupal, in particular, is the first open source project I became deeply involved in, and my income from Drupal work has supported my family for years.

I've attended local Drupal Camps, many DrupalCons, and even worked for a few great Drupal companies. The Drupal Association has been a major part of sustaining the Drupal community for many years, and due to COVID-19, they're struggling financially this year.

They rely heavily on DrupalCon revenue, and they use those funds to maintain and grow drupal.org, market Drupal, and support community events.

How I livestream with OBS, a Sony a6000, and a Cam Link

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A few weeks before this year's pandemic started affecting the US, I started live-streaming on my YouTube channel.

In the past, I've helped run live streams for various events, from liturgies in a cathedral to youth events in a stadium. (I even wrote a blog post on the topic a few weeks ago.)

For larger events, there was usually a team of camera operators. We also had remote control 'PTZ' cameras, and dedicated streaming hardware like a Tricaster.

For my own livestreams, I had a very limited budget, and only one person (me) to operate the camera, produce the live stream, and be the content on the live stream!

Basement Sewing Room Build - Timelapse

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We have one corner in our basement that has never been touched since the day we moved in.

Now that we have three kids and the need for more playing area in our basement, my wife and I decided to consolidate all her sewing stuff into one part of the basement (apparently fabric is to sewers as scrap wood is to woodworkers).