Recent Blog Posts

Rendering Twig templates programmatically in Drupal 8

From time to time, I have the need to take a Twig template and a set of variables, render the template, replacing all the variables within, and then get the output as a string. For example, if I want to have a really simple email template in a custom module which has a variable for first_name, so I can customize the email before sending it via Drupal or PHP, I could do the following in Drupal 7:

Mounting a Kubernetes Secret as a single file inside a Pod

Recently I needed to mount an SSH private key used for one app to connect to another app into a running Pod, but to make sure it was done securely, we put the SSH key into a Kubernetes Secret, and then mounted the Secret into a file inside the Pod spec for a Deployment.

I wanted to document the process here because (a) I know I'm going to have to do it again and this will save me a few minutes' research, and (b) it's very slightly unintuitive (at least to me).

First I defined a secret in a namespace:

Cleaning up after adding files in Drupal Behat tests

I've been going kind of crazy covering a particular Drupal site I'm building in Behat tests—testing every bit of core functionality on the site. In this particular case, a feature I'm testing allows users to upload arbitrary files to an SFTP server, then Drupal shows those filenames in a streamlined UI.

I needed to be able to test the user action of "I'm a user, I upload a file to this directory, then I see the file listed in a certain place on the site."

These files are not managed by Drupal (e.g. they're not file field uploads), but if they were, I'd invest some time in resolving this issue in the drupalextension project: "When I attach the file" and Drupal temporary files.

Since they are just random files dropped on the filesystem, I needed to:

Git 2.20.1 is super slow on macOS Mojave on my work Mac

Update: I just upgraded my personal mac to 2.20.1, and am experiencing none of the slowdown I had on my work Mac. So something else is afoot. Maybe some of the 'spyware-ish' software that's installed on the work mark is making calls like lstat() super slow? Looks like I might be profiling some things on that machine anyways :)

I regularly use Homebrew to switch to more recent versions of CLI utilities and other packages I use in my day-to-day software and infrastructure development. In the past, it was necessary to use Homebrew to get a much newer version of Git than was available at the time on macOS. But as Apple's evolved macOS, they've done a pretty good job of keeping the system versions relatively up-to-date, and unless you need bleeding edge features, the version of Git that's installed on macOS Mojave (2.17.x) is probably adequate for now.

But back to Homebrew—recently I ran brew upgrade to upgrade a bunch of packages, and it happened to upgrade Git to 2.20.1.

Make composer operations with Drupal way faster and easier on RAM

tl;dr: Run composer require zaporylie/composer-drupal-optimizations:^1.0 in your Drupal codebase to halve Composer's RAM usage and make operations like require and update 3-4x faster.

A few weeks ago, I noticed Drupal VM's PHP 5.6 automated test suite started failing on the step that runs composer require drupal/drush. (PSA: PHP 5.6 is officially dead. Don't use it anymore. If you're still using it, upgrade to a supported version ASAP!). This was the error message I was getting from Travis CI:

PHP Fatal error:  Allowed memory size of 2147483648 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 32 bytes) in phar:///usr/bin/composer/src/Composer/DependencyResolver/RuleWatchNode.php on line 40

I ran the test suite locally, and didn't have the same issue (locally I have PHP's CLI memory limit set to -1 so it never runs out of RAM unless I do insane-crazy things.

Updating a Kubernetes Deployment and waiting for it to roll out in a shell script

For some Kubernetes cluster operations (e.g. deploying an update to a small microservice or app), I need a quick and dirty way to:

  1. Build and push a Docker image to a private registry.
  2. Update a Kubernetes Deployment to use this new image version.
  3. Wait for the Deployment rollout to complete.
  4. Run some post-rollout operations (e.g. clear caches, run an update, etc.).

There are a thousand and one ways to do all this, and many are a bit more formal than this, but sometimes you just need a shell script you can run from your CI server to do it all. And it's not too hard, nor complex, to do it this way:

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