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External GPUs and the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 eschews a built-in USB 3.0 controller and exposes a 1x PCI Express lane.

The slightly older Raspberry Pi 4 model B could be hacked to get access to the PCIe lane (sacrificing the VL805 USB 3.0 controller chip in the process), but it was a bit of a delicate operation and only a few daring souls tried it.

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 with Zotac Nvidia GeForce GT 710 GPU

Watch this video for more detail about my experience using these GPUs on the CM4:
GPUs on a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4!

Overclocking the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

People have been overclocking Raspberry Pis since the beginning of time, and the Raspberry Pi 4 is no exception.

I wanted to see if the Compute Module 4 (see my full review here) could handle overclocking the same way, and how fast I could get mine to run without crashing.

There's a video version of this blog post, if you'd like to watch that instead:
Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 OVERCLOCKED.

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Review

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

Introduction

Six years ago, the Raspberry Pi Foundation introduced the Compute Module: a teensy-tiny version of the popular Raspberry Pi model B board.

Between then and now, there have been multiple revisions to the Compute Module, like the 3+ I used in my Raspberry Pi Cluster YouTube series, but they've all had the same basic form factor and a very limited feature set.

But today, that all changes with the fourth generation of the compute module, the Compute Module 4! Here's a size comparison with the previous-generation Compute Module 3+, some other common Pi models, and an SD and microSD card (remember when the original Pi used a full-size SD card?):

Continuous Testing with Molecule, Ansible, and GitHub Actions

The earlier you catch defects,
the cheaper they are to fix.

– David Farley

Earlier today, I presented a session at AnsibleFest 2020 titled 'Continuous Testing with Molecule, Ansible, and GitHub Actions'. I also pre-recorded the session so I could share it on my YouTube channel, and for your convenience, the video is embedded below:

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The presentation uses an example and explanation from Chapter 13 in my book, Ansible for DevOps.

Raspberry Pi USB Boot - UASP, TRIM, and performance

In the past few weeks, I reviewed USB drive performance on the Raspberry Pi 4, and the importance of UASP support for USB drive performance.

Both posts generated great discussion, and there were three things I wanted to cover in this follow-up, namely:

  1. Which drives support UASP
  2. Real-world performance benchmarks
  3. TRIM support

For reference, here are all the products I'm testing in this post (product links are to their Amazon product page, starting from top middle, clockwise):

USB Performance testing - SATA SSD, NVMe, and Flash drives

What does Nvidia buying ARM mean for Raspberry Pi?

Over the weekend, Nvidia confirmed it would purchase ARM from Softbank for $40 billion.

Now, what is ARM, why is Nvidia buying it, and what does any of this have to do with the Raspberry Pi?

Well, let's start with ARM.

This blog post also has a video version to go along with it.

What is ARM?

ARM can refer to a number of things, but let's start by talking about the company, Arm Holdings. They have lineage dating back to Acorn computers, a British computer manufacturer founded in the late 1970s that designed the first 'Acorn RISC Machine architecture' chips, AKA 'ARM'.

BBC Micro Minicomputer - Source: Wikipedia