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Monitor your Internet with a Raspberry Pi

Internet Service Providers are almost universally despised. They've pushed for the FCC to continue defining 25 Mbps as "high use" broadband, and on top of that they overstate the quality of service they provide. A recently-released map of broadband availability in the US paints a pretty dire picture:

USA map showing areas with limited high speed broadband availability

Here in St. Louis—where I guess I should count my lucky stars we have 'high use' broadband available—I have only two options: I can get 'gigabit' cable Internet from Spectrum, or 75 megabit DSL from AT&T.

That's it.

And you're probably thinking, "Gigabit Internet is great, stop complaining!"

Review of Raspberry Pi's PoE+ HAT (June 2021)

The PoE+ HAT powers a Raspberry Pi 3 B+ or 4 model B over a single Ethernet cable, allowing you to skip the USB-C power adapter, assuming you have a PoE capable switch or injector.

Unfortunately, I can't recommend this new PoE+ HAT for most users, at least not in its current state.

For more background on PoE in general, and a bit more detail about the board itself and my tests, please watch my video on the PoE+ HAT—otherwise scroll past it and read on for all the testing results:

AWS S3 Glacier Deep Archive - Difficulty deleting files with accents

A few days ago, my personal AWS account's billing alert fired, and delivered me an email saying I'd already exceeded my personal comfort threshold—in the second week of the month!

AWS billing alert email

Knowing that I had just rearranged my entire backup plan because I wanted to change the structure of my archives both locally and in my S3 Glacier Deep Archive mirror on AWS, I suspected something didn't get moved or deleted within my backup S3 bucket.

And I was right.

But I wanted to write this up for two reasons:

Allowing Ansible playbooks to work with new user groups on first run

For a long time, I've had some Ansible playbooks—most notably ones that would install Docker then start some Docker containers—where I had to split them in two parts, or at least run them twice, because they relied on the control user having a new group assigned for some later tasks.

The problem is, Ansible would connect over SSH to a server, and use that connection for subsequent tasks. If you add a group to the user (e.g. docker), then keep running more tasks, that new group assignment won't be picked up until the SSH connection is reset (similar to how if you're logged in, you'd have to log out and log back in to see your new groups).

The easy fix for this? Add a reset_connection meta task in your play to force Ansible to drop its persistent SSH connection and reconnect to the server:

Moving my home media library from iTunes to Jellyfin and Infuse

Since 2008, I've ripped every DVD and Blu-Ray I bought to my Mac, with a collection of SD and HD media totaling around 2 TB today. To make that library accessible, I've always used iTunes and the iTunes Shared Library functionality that—while it still exists today—seems to be on life support, in kind of a "we still support it because the code is there" state.

The writing's been on the wall for a few years, especially after the split from iTunes to "Music" and "TV" apps, and while I tested out Plex a few years back, I never really considered switching to another home media library system, mostly due to laziness.

Jeff with Mac mini NAS

I have a 2010 Mac mini (see above) that's acted as my de-facto media library/NAS for over a decade... and it's still running strong, with an upgraded 20 TB of total storage space. But it's been unsupported by Apple for a few years, and besides, I have a new ASUSTOR Lockerstor 4 with 16 TB of always-online NAS storage!

The Wiretrustee SATA Pi Board is a true SATA NAS

In my earlier posts about building a custom Raspberry Pi SATA NAS, and supercharging it with 2.5G networking and OMV, I noted that my builds were experimental only—they were a mess of cables and parts, with a hilariously-oversized 700W PC power supply.

I lamented the fact there was no simple "SATA backplane on a board" for the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4. But no longer.

Wiretrustee SATA Board for Raspberry Pi OMV NAS

Wiretrustee's SATA Board integrates a SATA controller and data and power for up to four SATA drives with a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4.

And their entire solution makes for a great little Raspberry Pi-based NAS, using software like OpenMediaVault.