Recent Blog Posts

Drupal Camp St. Louis is taking a break for 2018

The St. Louis Drupal Users Group has hosted a Drupal Camp in the 'Gateway to the West' for four years (since 2014), but this year, the organizers have decided to take a year off, for various reasons. Our camp has grown a little every year, and last year we even increased the scope and usefulness of the camp even more by adding a well-attended training day—but life and work have taken precedence this year, and nobody is able to take on the role of 'chief organizer'.

Meet me in Des Moines St. Louis Drupal Camp goes to DrupalCorn in Iowa

All is not lost, however! There are other great camps around the Midwest, and this year we're directing everyone to our northern neighbors, in Iowa: DrupalCorn Camp is going to be held in Des Moines, Iowa, from September 27-30, 2018!

Post-Mollom, what are the best options for preventing spam for Drupal?

Mollom End of Life Announcement from their homepage

Earlier this month, Mollom was officially discontinued. If you still have the Mollom module installed on some of your Drupal sites, form submissions that were previously protected by Mollom will behave as if Mollom was offline completely, meaning any spam Mollom would've prevented will be passed through.

For many Drupal sites, especially smaller sites that deal mostly with bot spam, there are a number of great modules that will help prevent 90% or more of all spam submissions, for example:

Use Ansible's YAML callback plugin for a better CLI experience

Ansible is a great tool for automating IT workflows, and I use it to manage hundreds of servers and cloud services on a daily basis. One of my small annoyances with Ansible, though, is it's default CLI output—whenever there's a command that fails, or a command or task that succeeds and dumps a bunch of output to the CLI, the default visible output is not very human-friendly.

For example, in a Django installation example from chapter 3 of my book Ansible for DevOps, there's an ad-hoc command to install Django on a number of CentOS app servers using Ansible's yum module. Here's how it looks in the terminal when you run that task the first time, using Ansible's default display options, and there's a failure:

Ansible 2.5 default callback plugin

...it's not quickly digestible—and this is one of the shorter error messages I've seen!

The ASUS Tinker Board is a compelling upgrade from a Raspberry Pi 3 B+

I've had a long history playing around with Raspberry Pis and other Single Board Computers (SBCs); from building a cluster of Raspberry Pis to run Drupal, to building a distributed home temperature monitoring system with Raspberry Pis, I've spent a good deal of time testing the limits of an SBC, and also finding ways to use their strengths to my advantage.

ASUS Tinker Board SBC

Drupal, the Fastest - Improving the evaluator experience

At DrupalCon Nashville 2018, I became deeply interested in the realm of first-time Drupal experiences, specifically around technical evaluation, and how people would get their feet wet with Drupal. There were two great BoFs related to the topic which I attended, and which I hope will bear some fruits over the next year in making Drupal easier for newcomers:

There are a number of different tools people can use to run a new Drupal installation, but documentation and ease of use for beginners is all over the place. The intention of this project is to highlight the most stable, simple, and popular ways to get a Drupal site installed and running for testing or site building, and measure a few benchmarks to help determine which one(s) might be best for Drupal newcomers.

Re-partitioning and reinstalling a newer version of Fedora on my laptop

Fedora 26 Installer - Installing software progress bar

I wanted to document this process on my blog, since it's the second time I've had to do it, and it always takes me way longer to figure it out than it should... basically, here's how you can take a laptop with a hard disk that's running an older version of Fedora (in my case, Fedora 23), use the Fedora install media to re-partition the drive, then install a newer version of Fedora (in my case, Fedora 26):

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