storage

Expanding K8s PVs in EKS on AWS

If that post title isn't a mouthful...

I'm excited to be moving a few EKS clusters into real-world production use after a few months of preparation. Besides my Raspberry Pi Dramble project (which is pretty low-key), these are the only production-grade Kubernetes clusters I've dealt with—and I've learned a lot. Enough that I'm working on a new book.

Anyways, back to the main topic: As of Kubernetes 1.11, you can auto-expand PVs from most cloud providers, AWS included. And since EKS now runs Kubernetes 1.11.x, you can have your EBS PVs automatically expand by just increasing the PVC claim size in spec.resources.requests.storage to a larger size (e.g. 10Gi to 20Gi).

To make sure this works, though, you need to make sure of a few things:

Make sure you have the proper setting on your StorageClass

You need to make sure the StorageClass you're using has the allowVolumeExpansion setting enabled, e.g.:

Simple GlusterFS Setup with Ansible

The following is an excerpt from Chapter 8 of Ansible for DevOps, a book on Ansible by Jeff Geerling.

Modern infrastructure often involves some amount of horizontal scaling; instead of having one giant server, with one storage volume, one database, one application instance, etc., most apps use two, four, ten, or dozens of servers.

GlusterFS Architecture Diagram

Many applications can be scaled horizontally with ease, but what happens when you need shared resources, like files, application code, or other transient data, to be shared on all the servers? And how do you have this data scale out with your infrastructure, in a fast but reliable way? There are many different approaches to synchronizing or distributing files across servers:

Setting up GlusterFS with Ansible

NOTE: This blog post was written prior to Ansible including the gluster_volume module, and is out of date; the examples still work, but Ansible for DevOps has been since updated with a more relevant and complete example. You can read about it here: Simple GlusterFS Setup with Ansible (Redux).

Modern infrastructure often involves some amount of horizontal scaling; instead of having one giant server, with one storage volume, one database, one application instance, etc., most apps use two, four, ten, or dozens of servers.

Many applications can be scaled horizontally with ease, but what happens when you need shared resources, like files, application code, or other transient data, to be shared on all the servers? And how do you have this data scale out with your infrastructure, in a fast but reliable way? There are many different approaches to synchronizing or distributing files across servers:

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