k8s

Mounting a Kubernetes Secret as a single file inside a Pod

Recently I needed to mount an SSH private key used for one app to connect to another app into a running Pod, but to make sure it was done securely, we put the SSH key into a Kubernetes Secret, and then mounted the Secret into a file inside the Pod spec for a Deployment.

I wanted to document the process here because (a) I know I'm going to have to do it again and this will save me a few minutes' research, and (b) it's very slightly unintuitive (at least to me).

First I defined a secret in a namespace:

Fixing '503 Service Unavailable' and 'Endpoints not available' for Traefik Ingress in Kubernetes

In a Kubernetes cluster I'm building, I was quite puzzled when setting up Ingress for one of my applications—in this case, Jenkins.

I had created a Deployment for Jenkins (in the jenkins namespace), and an associated Service, which exposed port 80 on a ClusterIP. Then I added an Ingress resource which directed the URL jenkins.example.com at the jenkins Service on port 80.

Inspecting both the Service and Ingress resource with kubectl get svc -n jenkins and kubectl get ingress -n jenkins, respectively, showed everything seemed to be configured correctly:

Kubernetes' Complexity

Over the past month, I started rebuilding the Raspberry Pi Dramble project using Kubernetes instead of installing and configuring the LEMP stack directly on nodes via Ansible (track GitHub issues here). Along the way, I've hit tons of minor issues with the installation, and I wanted to document some of the things I think turn people away from Kubernetes early in the learning process. Kubernetes is definitely not the answer to all application hosting problems, but it is a great fit for some, and it would be a shame for someone who could really benefit from Kubernetes to be stumped and turn to some other solution that costs more in time, money, or maintenance!

Raspberry Pi Dramble cluster running Kubernetes with Green LEDs

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