devops

Real World DevOps

This blog post contains a written transcript of my NEDCamp 2018 keynote, Real World DevOps, edited to match the style of this blog. Accompanying resources: presentation slides, video (coming soon).

Jeff Geerling at NEDCamp 2018 - New England Drupal Camp

I'm Jeff Geerling; you probably know that because my name appears in huge letters at the top of every page on this site, including the post you're reading right now. I currently work at Acquia as a Senior Technical Architect, building hosting infrastructure projects using some buzzword-worthy tech like Kubernetes, AWS, and Cloud.

NEDCamp 2018 - Keynote on DevOps

Over the past decade, I've enjoyed presenting sessions at many DrupalCamps, DrupalCon, and other tech conferences. The conferences are some of the highlights of my year (at least discounting all the family things I do!), and lately I've been appreciative of the local communities I meet and get to be a part of (even if for a very short time) at Drupal Camps.

The St. Louis Drupal Users Group has chosen to put off it's annual Camp to 2019, so we're guiding people to DrupalCorn Camp, which is only a little bit north of us, in Iowa.

NEDCamp New England Drupal Camp logo

Properly deploying updates to or shutting down Jenkins

One of my most popular Ansible roles is the geerlingguy.jenkins role, and for good reason—Jenkins is pretty much the premiere open source CI tool, and has been used for many years by Ops and Dev teams all over the place.

As Jenkins (or other CI tools) are adopted more fully for automating all aspects of infrastructure work, you begin to realize how important the Jenkins server(s) become to your daily operations. And then you realize you need CI for your CI. And you need to have version control and deployment processes for things like Jenkins updates, job updates, etc. The geerlingguy.jenkins role helps a lot with the main component of automating Jenkins install and configuration, and then you can add on top of that a task that copies config.xml files with each job definition into your $JENKINS_HOME to ensure every job and every configuration is in code...

Getting Munin-node to monitor Nginx and Apache, the easy way

Since this is something I think I've bumped into at least eight times in the past decade, I thought I'd document, comprehensively, how I get Munin to monitor Apache and/or Nginx using the apache_* and nginx_* Munin plugins that come with Munin itself.

Besides the obvious action of symlinking the plugins into Munin's plugins folder, you should—to avoid any surprises—forcibly configure the env.url for all Apache and Nginx servers. As an example, in your munin-node configuration (on RedHat/CentOS, in /etc/munin/plugin-conf.d, add a file named something like apache or nginx):

# For Nginx:
[nginx*]
env.url http://localhost/nginx_status

# For Apache:
[apache*]
env.url http://localhost/server-status?auto

Now, something that often trips me up—especially since I maintain a variety of servers and containers, with some running ancient forms of CentOS, while others are running more recent builds of Debian, Fedora, or Ubuntu—is that localhost doesn't always mean what you'd think it means.

Fix for Ansible hanging when used with Docker and TTY

For almost all my Ansible roles on Ansible Galaxy, I have a comprehensive suite of tests that run against all supported OSes on Travis CI, and the only way that's possible is using Docker containers (one container for each OS/test combination).

For the past year or so, I've been struggling with some of the test suites having strange issues when I use docker exec --tty (which passes through Ansible's pretty coloration) along with Ansible playbooks running inside Docker containers in Travis CI. It seems that certain services, when restarted on OSes running sysvinit (like Ubuntu 14.04 and CentOS 6), cause ansible-playbook to hang indefinitely, resulting in a build failure:

How I test Ansible configuration on 7 different OSes with Docker

The following post is an excerpt from chapter 11 in my book Ansible for DevOps. The example used is an Ansible role that installs Java—since the role is supposed to work across CentOS 6 and 7, Fedora 24, Ubuntu 12.04, 14.04, and 16.04, and Debian 8, I use Docker to run an end-to-end functional test on each of those Linux distributions. See an example test run in Travis CI, and the Travis file that describes the build.

Note: I do the same thing currently (as of 2019), but now I'm using Molecule to tie everything together; see Testing your Ansible roles with Molecule.

What's new in Ansible 2 and Ansible Galaxy 2 (Presentation)

Last night I presented the following slides at the Ansible St. Louis meetup at Riot Games. In the presentation, I mention the motivation behind Ansible and Galaxy 2, and run through most of the major changes and new features:

I've incorporated many of the new features in Ansible 2.0 in my book, Ansible for DevOps, and will be rewriting a few of the examples in the book to take advantage of new features in Ansible 2 soon!

#vBrownBag DevOps presentation - Oct 29 [Updated]

In the middle of preparations for next month's Souls & Goals soccer match, I've also been very busy with Ansible-related activities.

I'm still making progress in writing Ansible for DevOps (over 45,000 words, and over 900 people have already bought the book on LeanPub!), and I've been invited by the folks at Professional VMWare to present in their #vBrownBag DevOps Series! I'll be talking about Ansible for an hour or so, and I'll be sure to post the link to the presentation after it's over.

You can join the presentation live (starts at 7:30 p.m. CST tonight, October 29) by registering at http://professionalvmware.com/brownbags/.

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