starlink

Setting up Starlink, SpaceX's Satellite Internet

Starlink Dishy and box from SpaceX

In March, I got an email from SpaceX saying Starlink was available at my address, and I could pre-order. I paid $500 for the equipment, plus $25 for a Volcano Roof Mount, and $99 for the first month of service, and a few weeks later, I got the kit you see in the image above.

I was a little too excited about getting Starlink, though, because I realized after I started looking for mounting locations that Starlink needed a 100° view of the northern sky, and my house is literally surrounded by 70-80 ft trees.

So I thought, why not let a cousin who lives out in a rural area try it out while I figure out what to do about mounting 'Dishy' (a common nickname for the Starlink satellite dish) on my own house?

After all, my cousin Annie, who lives in Jonesburg, MO, currently pays for the maximum available DSL plan to her farm (Haarmann Farms), and gets a measly 5 Mbps down, and 0.46 Mbps up—on a good day:

Setting up a Pi for remote Internet connection monitoring

So... recently I acquired a Starlink 'Dishy', and I'm going to be installing it at a rural location near where I live, but since it's a bit of a drive to get to it, I wanted to set up a Raspberry Pi to monitor the Starlink connection quality over time.

Internet monitoring dashboard in Grafana

I know the Starlink app has its own monitoring, but I like to have my own fancy independent monitoring in place too.

The wrinkle with a Starlink-based Internet connection, though, is that SpaceX is using Carrier-Grade NAT (CGNAT) on their network, so there won't be any kind of IPv4 address I could reach the Pi at, nor does SpaceX yet have IPv6 set up in their network.

So to make remote access possible, I would have to find a way to have the Pi reach out to one of my servers with a persistent connection, then I could 'tunnel' through that server from other locations to reach the Pi.