molecule

The Kubernetes Collection for Ansible

Opera-bull with Ansible bull looking on

The Ansible community has long been a victim of its own success. Since I got started with Ansible in 2013, the growth in the number of Ansible modules and plugins has been astronomical. That's what happens when you build a very simple but powerful tool—easy enough for anyone to extend into any automation use case.

When I started, I remember writing in Ansible for DevOps about 'hundreds' of modules—at the time, mostly covering Linux administration use cases. Today there are many thousands, covering Linux and Windows server administration, network automation, security automation, and even stranger use cases.

Jan-Piet Mens summed it up succinctly in a blog post last year, titled I care about Ansible:

In my opinion they’re being inundated.

Molecule fails on converge and says test instance was already 'created' and 'prepared'

I hit this problem every once in a while; basically, I run molecule test or molecule converge (in this case it was for a Kubernetes Operator I was building with Ansible), and it says the instance is already created/prepared—even though it is not—and then Molecule fails on the 'Gathering Facts' portion of the converge step:

How to add integration tests to an Ansible collection with Molecule

Note: Ansible Collections are currently in tech preview. The details of this blog post may be outdated by the time you read this, though I will try to keep things updated if possible.

Ansible 2.8 and 2.9 introduced a new type of Ansible content, a 'Collection'. Collections are still in tech preview state, so things are prone to change.

Ansible Collections must be in a very specific path, like {...}/ansible_collections/{namespace}/{collection}/

You have to make sure your collection is in that specific path—with an empty directory named ansible_collections, then a directory for the namespace, and finally a directory for the collection itself. I opened an issue in the Ansible issue queue asking if ansible-test can allow running tests in an arbitrary collection directory, and for Molecule itself, there's more of a 'meta' issue, Molecule and Ansible Collections.

Testing your Ansible roles with Molecule

After the announcement on September 26 that Ansible will be adopting molecule and ansible-lint as official 'Ansible by Red Hat' projects, I started moving more of my public Ansible projects over to Molecule-based tests instead of using the homegrown Docker-based Ansible testing rig I'd been using for a few years.

Molecule sticker in front of AnsibleFest 2018 Sticker

There was also a bit of motivation from readers of Ansible for DevOps, many of whom have asked for a new section on Molecule specifically!

In this blog post, I'll walk you through how to use Molecule, and how I converted all my existing roles (which were using a different testing system) to use Molecule and Ansible Lint-based tests.

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