intel

WiFi 6 gets 1.34 Gbps on the Raspberry Pi CM4

January 1, 2021 Update: My 1.34 Gbps benchmark was flawed. See this GitHub issue and this updated blog post to learn more: WiFi 6 is not faster than Ethernet on the Raspberry Pi.

EDUP Intel AX200 WiFi 6 802.11ax PCIe card in Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 IO Board

After buying three wireless cards, a new WiFi router, optimizing my process for cross-compiling the Linux kernel for the Raspberry Pi, installing Intel's WiFi firmware, and patching Intel's wireless driver to make it work on the Raspberry Pi, I benchmarked the EDUP Intel AX200 WiFi 6 PCIe card and got 1.34 Gbps of bandwidth between the Raspberry Pi and a new ASUS WiFi 6 router.

This is my story.

5 Gbps Ethernet on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

tl;dr: I successfully got the Intel I340-T4 4x Gigabit NIC working on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4, and combining all the interfaces (including the internal Pi interface), I could get up to 3.06 Gbps maximum sustained throughput.

Update: I was able to boost things a bit to get 4.15 Gbps! Check out my video here: 4+ Gbps Ethernet on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4.

After my failure to light up a monitor with my first attempt at getting a GPU working with the Pi, I figured I'd try something a little more down-to-earth this time.

And to that end, I present to you this four-interface gigabit network card from Intel, the venerable I340-T4:

Intel I340-T4 NIC for PCI Express x4

What does Apple Silicon mean for the Raspberry Pi and ARM64?

Note: There's a video version of this blog post available here: What does Apple Silicon mean for the Raspberry Pi and ARM64?

Apple Silicon and the Raspberry Pi

A couple weeks ago I tried using the latest Raspberry Pi 4 8 gig model as my main computer for a day, and I posted a video about my experience.

Besides many diehard Linux fans complaining in the comments about my apparent idiocy caused by being a Mac user, the experience taught me one thing: A lot of software still isn't built for 64-bit ARM processors, or even for Linux in general.

But there's one trend that I'm seeing: most of the open source software I use already works great on a Pi 4 running on its 64-bit ARM processor.