galaxy

Automatically building and publishing Ansible Galaxy Collections

I maintain a large number of Ansible Galaxy roles, and publish hundreds of new releases every year. If the process weren't fully automated, there would be no way I could keep up with it. For Galaxy roles, the process of tagging and publishing a new release is very simple, because Ansible Galaxy ties the role strongly to GitHub's release system. All that's needed is a webhook in your .travis.yml file (if using Travis CI):

notifications:
  webhooks: https://galaxy.ansible.com/api/v1/notifications/

For collections, Ansible Galaxy actually hosts an artifact—a .tar.gz file containing the collection contents. This offers some benefits that I won't get into here, but also a challenge: someone has to build and upload that artifact... and that takes more than one or two lines added to a .travis.yml file.

Until recently, I had been publishing collection releases manually. The process went something like:

How to evaluate community Ansible roles for your playbooks

The following is a transcript of the content in my AnsibleFest Atlanta 2019 session, There's a role for that! How to evaluate community roles for your playbooks.

Introduction

I'm Jeff Geerling, I wrote a book on Ansible (Ansible for DevOps), I have used Ansible on an almost daily basis for hundreds of different projects since 2013, and I now work with Red Hat's Ansible team as a technical contractor.

Some people wonder ask how teams can be productive while maintaining many applications on a variety of cloud providers. One of the key reasons is reliance on Ansible content contributed and maintained by others.

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