docker

Drupal VM does Docker

Drupal VM on Docker Hub

Drupal VM has used Vagrant and (usually) VirtualBox to run Drupal infrastructure locally since its inception. But ever since Docker became 'the hot new thing' in infrastructure tooling, I've been asked when Drupal VM will convert to using Docker.

The answer to that question is a bit nuanced; Drupal VM has been using Docker to run its own integration tests for over a year (that's how I run tests on seven different OSes using Travis CI). And technically, Drupal VM's core components have always been able to run inside Docker containers (most of them use Docker-based integration tests as well).

But Docker usage was always an undocumented and unsupported feature of Drupal VM. But no longer—with 4.5.0, Drupal VM now supports Docker as an experimental alternative to Vagrant + VirtualBox, and you can use Drupal VM with Docker in one of two ways:

Bash logic structures and conditionals (if, case, loops, etc.) in Travis CI

Travis CI's documentation often mentions the fact that it can call out to shell scripts in your repository, and recommends anything more complicated than a command or two (maybe including a pipe or something) be placed in a separate shell script.

But there are times when it's a lot more convenient to just keep the Travis CI-specific logic inside my repositories' .travis.yml file.

As it turns out, YAML is well-suited to, basically, inlining shell scripts. YAML's literal scalar indicator (a pipe, or |) allows you to indicate a block of content where newlines should be preserved, though whitespace before and after the line will be trimmed.

So if you have a statement like:

if [ "${variable}" == "something" ]; then
  do_something_here
fi

You can represent that in YAML via:

Fix for Ansible hanging when used with Docker and TTY

For almost all my Ansible roles on Ansible Galaxy, I have a comprehensive suite of tests that run against all supported OSes on Travis CI, and the only way that's possible is using Docker containers (one container for each OS/test combination).

For the past year or so, I've been struggling with some of the test suites having strange issues when I use docker exec --tty (which passes through Ansible's pretty coloration) along with Ansible playbooks running inside Docker containers in Travis CI. It seems that certain services, when restarted on OSes running sysvinit (like Ubuntu 14.04 and CentOS 6), cause ansible-playbook to hang indefinitely, resulting in a build failure:

How I test Ansible configuration on 7 different OSes with Docker

The following post is an excerpt from chapter 11 in my book Ansible for DevOps. The example used is an Ansible role that installs Java—since the role is supposed to work across CentOS 6 and 7, Fedora 24, Ubuntu 12.04, 14.04, and 16.04, and Debian 8, I use Docker to run an end-to-end functional test on each of those Linux distributions. See an example test run in Travis CI, and the Travis file that describes the build.

Note: I do the same thing currently (as of 2019), but now I'm using Molecule to tie everything together; see Testing your Ansible roles with Molecule.

Reintroducing the sanity of CM to container management

Recently, Ansible introduced Ansible Container, a tool that builds and orchestrates Docker containers.

While tools that build and orchestrate Docker containers are a dime a dozen these days (seriously... Kubernetes, Mesos, Rancher, Fleet, Swarm, Deis, Kontena, Flynn, Serf, Clocker, Paz, Docker 1.12+ built-in, not to mention dozens of PaaSes), many are built in the weirdly-isolated world of "I only manage containers, and don't manage other infrastructure tasks."

The cool thing about using Ansible to do your container builds and orchestration is that Ansible can also do your networking configuration. And your infrastructure provisioning. And your legacy infrastructure configuration. And on top of that, Ansible is, IMO, the best-in-class configuration management tool—easy for developers and sysadmins to learn and use effectively, and as efficient/terse as (but much more powerful than) shell scripts.

From Ansible Container's own README:

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