ansible galaxy

What's new in Ansible 2 and Ansible Galaxy 2 (Presentation)

Last night I presented the following slides at the Ansible St. Louis meetup at Riot Games. In the presentation, I mention the motivation behind Ansible and Galaxy 2, and run through most of the major changes and new features:

I've incorporated many of the new features in Ansible 2.0 in my book, Ansible for DevOps, and will be rewriting a few of the examples in the book to take advantage of new features in Ansible 2 soon!

Testing Ansible Roles with Travis CI on GitHub

This post was originally written in 2014, using a technique that only easily allows testing on Ubuntu 12.04; since then, I've been adapting many of my roles (e.g. geerlingguy.apache) to use a Docker container-based testing approach, and I've written a new blog post that details the new technique: How I test Ansible configuration on 7 different OSes with Docker.

Since I'm now maintaining 37 roles on Ansible Galaxy, there's no way I can spend as much time reviewing every aspect of every role when doing maintenance, or checking out pull requests to improve the roles. Automated testing using a continuous integration tool like Travis CI (which is free for public projects and integrated very well with GitHub) allows me to run tests against my Ansible roles with every commit and be more assured nothing broke since the last commit.

Using Ansible Galaxy

Ansible Galaxy Logo

Ansible Galaxy was launched just a few short months ago, and already has over 500 roles maintained by over 225 users. The idea behind Galaxy is to give greater visibility to one of Ansible's most exciting features: reusable Roles for server configuration or application installation.

Galaxy is still in beta, and likely will be for a while longer, but if you have Ansible 1.4.2 or later installed, you can use the ansible-galaxy command to get started.

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