testing

Testing the 'Add user' and 'Edit account' forms in Drupal 8 with Behat

On a recent project, I needed to add some behavioral tests to cover the functionality of the Password Policy module. I seem to be a sucker for pain, because often I choose to test the things it seems there's no documentation on—like testing the functionality of the partially-Javascript-powered password fields on the user account forms.

In this case, I was presented with two challenges:

  • I needed to run one scenario where a user edits his/her own password, and must follow the site's configured password policy.
  • I needed to run another scenario where an admin creates a new user account, and must follow the site's configured password policy for the created user's password.

So I came up with the following scenarios:

Testing your Ansible roles with Molecule

After the announcement on September 26 that Ansible will be adopting molecule and ansible-lint as official 'Ansible by Red Hat' projects, I started moving more of my public Ansible projects over to Molecule-based tests instead of using the homegrown Docker-based Ansible testing rig I'd been using for a few years.

Molecule sticker in front of AnsibleFest 2018 Sticker

There was also a bit of motivation from readers of Ansible for DevOps, many of whom have asked for a new section on Molecule specifically!

In this blog post, I'll walk you through how to use Molecule, and how I converted all my existing roles (which were using a different testing system) to use Molecule and Ansible Lint-based tests.

Logging in as an existing user in a Behat test with the Drupal Extension

There are some occasions when I want my Drupal Behat tests to perform some action as a user that already exists on the Drupal site. For example, I have a test install profile with some Default Content (users, nodes, taxonomy terms, etc.), and it already has a large set of default test data set up on the site for the benefit of developers who need to work on theming/site building.

Rather than define a ton of extra Behat steps to re-create all this test content and these test users, I just want Behat to log in as an existing user and perform actions with the pre-existing content.

Note that this might not be a good idea depending on the structure or philosophy of your site's testing. As a general principle, state should be avoided—and that includes things like 'having a set of default stuff already existing before a test runs'. However, in the real world there are situations where it's a ton easier to just use the state that exists 🙃.

The problem

Out of the box, the Drupal API Driver lets you create a user in a Scenario and then use that created user, like so:

CI for Ansible playbooks which require Ansible Vault protected variables

I use Ansible Vault to securely store the project's secrets (e.g. API keys, default passwords, private keys, etc.) in the git repository for many of my infrastructure projects. I also like to make sure I cover everything possible in automated tests/CI, using either Jenkins or Travis CI (usually).

But this presents a conundrum: if some of your variables are encrypted with an Ansible Vault secret/passphrase, and that secret should be itself store securely... how can you avoid storing it in your CI system, where you might not be able to guarantee it's security?

The method I usually use for this case is including the Vault-encrypted vars at playbook runtime, using include_vars:

dockrun oneshot — quick local environments for testing infrastructure

Since I work among a ton of different Linux distros and environments in my day-to-day work, I have a lot of tooling set up that's mostly-OS-agnostic. I found myself in need of a quick barebones CentOS 7 VM to play around in or troubleshoot an issue. Or I needed to run Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 side by side and run the same command in each, checking for differences. Or I needed to bring up Fedora. Or Debian.

I used to use my Vagrant boxes for VirtualBox to boot a full VM, then vagrant ssh in. But that took at least 15-20 seconds—assuming I already had the box downloaded on my computer!

Fix for Ansible hanging when used with Docker and TTY

For almost all my Ansible roles on Ansible Galaxy, I have a comprehensive suite of tests that run against all supported OSes on Travis CI, and the only way that's possible is using Docker containers (one container for each OS/test combination).

For the past year or so, I've been struggling with some of the test suites having strange issues when I use docker exec --tty (which passes through Ansible's pretty coloration) along with Ansible playbooks running inside Docker containers in Travis CI. It seems that certain services, when restarted on OSes running sysvinit (like Ubuntu 14.04 and CentOS 6), cause ansible-playbook to hang indefinitely, resulting in a build failure:

Testing redirections using Behat and the Behat Drupal Extension

One project I'm working on needed a Behat test added to test whether a particular redirection works properly. Basically, I wanted to test for the following:

  1. An anonymous user accesses a file at a URL like http://www.example.com/pictures/test.jpg
  2. The anonymous user is redirected to the path http://www.example.com/sites/default/files/pictures/test.jpg

Since the site uses Apache, I added the actual redirect to the site's .htaccess file in the docroot, using the following Rewrite configuration:

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
  RewriteEngine on

  # Rewrite requests for /profile_images to public files directory location.
  RewriteRule ^ pictures/(.*)$ /sites/default/files/pictures/$1 [L,NC,R=301]
</IfModule>

Testing with curl --head, I could see that the proper headers were set—Location was set to the correct redirected URL, and the response gave a 301. So now I had to add the Behat test.

How I test Ansible configuration on 7 different OSes with Docker

The following post is an excerpt from chapter 11 in my book Ansible for DevOps. The example used is an Ansible role that installs Java—since the role is supposed to work across CentOS 6 and 7, Fedora 24, Ubuntu 12.04, 14.04, and 16.04, and Debian 8, I use Docker to run an end-to-end functional test on each of those Linux distributions. See an example test run in Travis CI, and the Travis file that describes the build.

Ansible Java role - Travis CI Docker-based test results

Honeypot for Drupal 8, 3 years in the making

Almost three years ago, on Feb 19, 2013, I opened the 8.x-dev branch of the Honeypot module (which helps prevent form spam on thousands of Drupal sites). These were heady times in the lifetime of the then-Drupal 8.x branch; 8.0-alpha1 wasn't released until three months later, on May 19. I made the #D8CX pledge—when Drupal 8 was released, I'd make sure there was a full, stable Honeypot release ready to go.

Little did I know it would be more than 2.5 years—and counting—before I could see that promise through to fruition!

As months turned into years, I've kept to the pledge, and eventually decided to also port a couple other modules that I use on many of my own Drupal sites, like Wysiwyg Linebreaks and Simple Mail.

Testing Ansible Roles with Travis CI on GitHub

This post was originally written in 2014, using a technique that only easily allows testing on Ubuntu 12.04; since then, I've been adapting many of my roles (e.g. geerlingguy.apache) to use a Docker container-based testing approach, and I've written a new blog post that details the new technique: How I test Ansible configuration on 7 different OSes with Docker.

Since I'm now maintaining 37 roles on Ansible Galaxy, there's no way I can spend as much time reviewing every aspect of every role when doing maintenance, or checking out pull requests to improve the roles. Automated testing using a continuous integration tool like Travis CI (which is free for public projects and integrated very well with GitHub) allows me to run tests against my Ansible roles with every commit and be more assured nothing broke since the last commit.

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