yaml

Parsing YAML files on the command line using Ruby

I have been working on an infrastructure project that uses YAML files for all inventory and configuration management, and for the most part, if you're using tools like Ansible, CloudFormation, etc., then you don't ever have to worry about the actual parsing of a YAML file, and keys and values in the file are readily accessible since these tools parse them and get them into a readable structure for you.

But there's often little bits of glue code, or infrastructure build/cleanup jobs, where you need to grab one specific value out of a YAML file, and all you have readily available is bash. Luckily for me, I also have Ruby available in the particular environment where I needed to parse the YAML file, so doing this was as easy as:

  1. Defining a little bit of Ruby code which would load the YAML file, then grab a value out of it.
  2. Running that Ruby code using ruby -e (-e for 'evaluate this code), operating on the contents of a YAML file.

And here's how that looked, in my case:

Changing a deeply-nested dict variable in an Ansible playbook

I recently had to build an Ansible playbook that takes in a massive inventory structure (read from a YAML file), modifies a specific key in that file, then dumps the file back to disk. There are some other ways that may be more efficient standalone (e.g. using a separate Python/PHP/Ruby/etc. script and a good YAML library), but since I had to do a number of other things in this Ansible playbook, I thought it would keep it simple if I could also modify the key inside the playbook.

I was scratching my head for a while, because while I knew that I could use the dict | combine() filter to merge two dicts together (this is a feature that was introduced in Ansible 2.0), I hadn't done so for a deeply-nested dict.

Bash logic structures and conditionals (if, case, loops, etc.) in Travis CI

Travis CI's documentation often mentions the fact that it can call out to shell scripts in your repository, and recommends anything more complicated than a command or two (maybe including a pipe or something) be placed in a separate shell script.

But there are times when it's a lot more convenient to just keep the Travis CI-specific logic inside my repositories' .travis.yml file.

As it turns out, YAML is well-suited to, basically, inlining shell scripts. YAML's literal scalar indicator (a pipe, or |) allows you to indicate a block of content where newlines should be preserved, though whitespace before and after the line will be trimmed.

So if you have a statement like:

if [ "${variable}" == "something" ]; then
  do_something_here
fi

You can represent that in YAML via:

YAML formatting and Drupal 8 - making things readable

As someone who loves YAML syntax (so much more pleasant to work with than JSON!), I wanted to jot down a few notes about syntax formatting for the benefit of Drupal 8 developers everywhere.

I often see copy/pasted YAML examples like the following:

object:
  child-object: {key: value, key2: {key: value}}

This is perfectly valid YAML. And technically any JSON is valid YAML too. That's part of what makes YAML so powerful—it's easy to translate between JSON and YAML, but YAML is way more readable!

So instead of using YAML like that, you can make the structure and relationships so much more apparent by formatting it like so:

YAML best practices for Ansible playbooks - tasks

This post is a follow-up to a recent discussion about YAML formatting for complex Ansible playbook tasks on the Ansible Project mailing list, and will also be appearing as part of Appendix B: Ansible Best Practices and Conventions in my Ansible for DevOps book on LeanPub.

YAML, a simple configuration language

YAML's usage for describing configuration has been increasing rapidly in the past few years, and with the introduction of SaltStack and Ansible, YAML finally made its way into the server configuration management realm as a first class citizen.

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