local development

Drupal, the Fastest - Improving the evaluator experience

At DrupalCon Nashville 2018, I became deeply interested in the realm of first-time Drupal experiences, specifically around technical evaluation, and how people would get their feet wet with Drupal. There were two great BoFs related to the topic which I attended, and which I hope will bear some fruits over the next year in making Drupal easier for newcomers:

There are a number of different tools people can use to run a new Drupal installation, but documentation and ease of use for beginners is all over the place. The intention of this project is to highlight the most stable, simple, and popular ways to get a Drupal site installed and running for testing or site building, and measure a few benchmarks to help determine which one(s) might be best for Drupal newcomers.

A modern way to build and develop Drupal 8 sites, using Composer

The Drupal community has been on an interesting journey since the launch of Drupal 8 in 2015. In the past three years, as the community has started to get its sea legs 'off the island' (using tools, libraries, and techniques used widely in the general PHP community), there have been growing pains.

One area where the pains have been (and sometimes still are) highly visible is in how Drupal and Composer work together. I've written posts like Composer and Drupal are still strange bedfellows in the past, and while in some ways that's still the case, we as a community are getting closer and closer to a nirvana with modern Drupal site building and project management.

For example, in preparing a hands-on portion of my and Matthew Grasmick's upcoming DrupalCon Nashville lab session on Composer and Drupal, I found that we're already to the point where you can go from literally zero to a fully functional and complete Drupal site codebase—along with a functional local development environment—in about 10 or 15 minutes:

Getting Started with Lando - testing a fresh Drupal 8 Umami site

Umami demo profile running on Lando for Drupal 8
Testing out the new Umami demo profile in Drupal 8.6.x.

I wanted to post a quick guide here for the benefit of anyone else just wanting to test out how Lando works or how it integrates with a Drupal project, since the official documentation kind of jumps you around different places and doesn't have any instructions for "Help! I don't already have a working Drupal codebase!":

Two MidCamp Sessions: Local Dev for Dummies, Jenkins and Drupal

MidCamp 2018 wrapped up with a bang today, as there was another year full of great training, sessions, and my favorite aspect, the 'hallway track' (where you go around and network between and during some sessions with tons of excellent Drupalists from the Midwest and around the country).

This year, I presented two sessions; one a co-presentation with Chris Urban titled Local Dev Environments for Dummies, the other a solo presentation titled Jenkins or: How I learned to stop worrying and love automation.

Embedded below are the video recordings of the sessions (recorded as always by the excellent Kevin Thull of Blue Drop Shop!):

What do you use to build and develop Drupal sites?

tl;dr: Go complete the Drupal Local Development Survey, and we'll present the results (among other things) at MidCamp in a couple weeks!

Local development for Drupal is a subject I've invested a lot of time into. At the start of my Drupal journey, I used to use MAMP, then MAMP Pro, then a native *AMP installation. Then when I learned about Vagrant I started building Vagrant-based environments with shell scripts. Then I learned Ansible and started using Vagrant and Ansible. And then I learned Docker and used Ansible, Docker, and sometimes Vagrant!

Everyone's journey is different—but one thing most of us can agree on is: it ain't easy finding a way to run Drupal on your local workstation if you've never done it before.

Should you use MAMP/WAMP/XAMPP? Should you use Acquia Dev Desktop? Should you use Docker or Vagrant and build your own environment? Should you use a packaged solution like Drupal VM or Lando? And then how will you manage your codebase? How will you build a theme?

dockrun oneshot — quick local environments for testing infrastructure

Since I work among a ton of different Linux distros and environments in my day-to-day work, I have a lot of tooling set up that's mostly-OS-agnostic. I found myself in need of a quick barebones CentOS 7 VM to play around in or troubleshoot an issue. Or I needed to run Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 side by side and run the same command in each, checking for differences. Or I needed to bring up Fedora. Or Debian.

I used to use my Vagrant boxes for VirtualBox to boot a full VM, then vagrant ssh in. But that took at least 15-20 seconds—assuming I already had the box downloaded on my computer!

Subscribe to RSS - local development