essay

Developing with VirtualBox and Vagrant on Windows

I've been supporting Drupal VM (a local Drupal CMS development environment) for Windows, Mac, and Linux for the past couple years, and have been using Vagrant and virtual machines for almost all my development (mostly PHP, but also some Python and Node.js at the moment) for the past four years. One theme that comes up quite frequently when dealing with VMs, open source software stacks (especially Drupal/LAMP), and development, is how much extra effort there is to make things work well on Windows.

Problem: tool-builders use Linux or macOS

The big problem, I see, is that almost all the tool-builders for OSS web software run either macOS or a flavor of Linux, and many don't even have access to a Windows PC (outside of maybe an odd VM for testing sites in Internet Explorer or Edge, if they're a designer/front-end developer). My evidence is anecdotal, but go to any OSS conference/meetup and you'll likely see the same.

Lessons Learned building the Raspberry Pi Dramble

Raspberry Pi Dramble Bramble Cluster

Edit: Many people have been asking for more technical detail, benchmarks, etc. There is much more information available on the Raspberry Pi Dramble Wiki (e.g. Power Consumption, microSD card benchmarks, etc.), if you're interested.

After the Raspberry Pi 2 model B was released, I decided the Pi was finally a fast enough computing platform (with its 4-core 900 MHz ARMv7 architecture) with enough memory (1 GB per Pi) to actually use for web infrastructure. If not in a production environment (I would definitely avoid putting the Pi into a role as a high-load 24x7x365 server), then for development and/or testing purposes. And for some fun!

PHP: It doesn't have to be a bad experience

It gets a little bit under my skin when I see a link to PHP: A fractal of bad design posted in the comments on every article mentioning PHP on tech sites, blogs, and forums.

Computer Reaction Face - Suspicious

PHP developers get it: PHP is full of ugly warts, and is not perfect. Far from it.

Developers brazen enough to admit they don't detest every minute of programming in PHP are blithely dismissed by 'real' developers. Ironically, many of these 'real' developers enjoy using some other dynamically-typed language to which 80% of the arguments against PHP equally apply.