docker compose

Be careful, Docker might be exposing ports to the world

Recently, I noticed logs for one of my web services had strange entries that looked like a bot trying to perform scripted attacks on an application endpoint. I was surprised, because all the endpoints that were exposed over the public Internet were protected by some form of authentication, or were locked down to specific IP addresses—or so I thought.

I had re-architected the service using Docker in the past year, and in the process of doing so, I changed the way the application ran—instead of having one server per process, I ran a group of processes on one server, and routed traffic to them using DNS names (one per process) and Nginx to proxy the traffic.

In this new setup, I built a custom firewall using iptables rules (since I had to control for a number of legacy services that I have yet to route through Docker—someday it will all be in Kubernetes), installed Docker, and set up a Docker Compose file (one per server) that ran all the processes in containers, using ports like 1234, 1235, etc.

The Docker Compose port declaration for each service looked like this:

Get started using Ansible AWX (Open Source Tower version) in one minute

Since yesterday's announcement that Ansible had released the code behind Ansible Tower, AWX, under an open source license, I've been working on an AWX Ansible role, a demo AWX Vagrant VM, and an AWX Ansible Container project.

As part of that last project, I have published two public Docker Hub images, awx_web and awx_task, which can be used with a docker-compose.yml file to build AWX locally in about as much time as it takes to download the Docker images: