vps

Limiting disk iops on a larger Munin server using rrdcached

I've long used Munin for basic resource monitoring on a huge variety of servers. It's simple, reliable, easy to configure, and besides the fact that it uses Perl for plugins, there's not much against it!

Last week, I got a notice from my 'low end box' VPS provider that my Munin server—which is aggregating data from about 50 other servers—had high IOPS and would be shut down if I didn't get it back into an allowed threshold. Most low end VPSes run things like static HTML websites, so disk IO is very low on average. I checked my Munin instance, and sure enough, it was constantly churning through around 50 iops. For a low end server, this can cause high iowait for other tenants of the same server, so I can understand why hosting providers don't want applications on their shared servers doing a lot of constant disk I/O.

Using iotop, I could see the munin-update processes were spending a lot of time writing to disk. And munin's own diskstats_iops plugin showed the same:

2013 VPS Benchmarks - Linode, Digital Ocean, Hot Drupal

Every year or two, I like to get a good overview of different hosting providers' VPS performance, and from time to time, I move certain websites and services to a new host based on my results.

In the past, I've stuck with Linode for many services (their end-to-end UX, and raw server performance is great!) that weren't intense on disk operations, and Hot Drupal for some sites that required high-performance IO (since Hot Drupal's VPSes use SSDs and are very fast). This year, though, after Digital Ocean jumped into the VPS hosting scene, I decided to give them a look.

Before going further, I thought I'd give a few quick benchmarks from each of the providers; these are all on middle-range plans (1 or 2GB RAM), and with the exception of Linode, the disks are all SSD, so should be super fast:

Disk Performance

Disk Performance Chart

Simple iptables rules for a typical LAMP server

I've seen a ton of iptables configurations on the Internet, and none of them really got to the heart of what I need to do for the majority of my LAMP-based web servers (hosted on Linode, HostGator, Hot Drupal, and elsewhere). For these servers, I just need a really simple set of rules that restricts all incoming traffic except for web (port 80/443 for http/https traffic), ssh (usually port 22), smtp (port 25), and icmp ping requests.

The script below (save it as 'firewall.bash', chmod u+x it to make it executable, and run it with $ sudo /path/to/firewall.bash, then test your server (access websites, log on to it from another Terminal session, ping it, etc., and make sure that's all working)):

Configure sendmail on CentOS to allow sending of email from localhost

For some of my Drupal sites and PHP scripts (and shell scripts) that I run on a VPS I manage, I need to simply be able to send outgoing emails from arbitrary email addresses. I could go into all the details of DNS SPF records and MX records here, but that's something you'll need to research on your own. This post simply shows how to install and configure sendmail on a CentOS box to just allow outgoing mail from php's mail() function, the mail command line utility, etc., and only from localhost (127.0.0.1):

First, install sendmail with $ sudo yum install sendmail sendmail-cf.

Then, configure sendmail by editing the file /etc/mail/sendmail.mc (don't edit the sendmail.cf file - we'll auto-generate that after setting things correctly in sendmail.mc).

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