Recent Blog Posts

Migrating Link fields with multiple properties with Drupal 8

Today I needed to migrate a URL/Link into a Drupal 8 site, and I was scratching my head over how to migrate it so there were distinct values for the URL (the actual link) and the Label (the 'title' that displays to end users and is clickable). Drupal 8's Link field type allows you to set a URL in addition to an optional (or required) label, but by default, if you just migrate the URL, the label will be blank.

I first set up the migration config like so:

...
process:
  field_url: source_url

And source_url was defined in the migration's source.fields configuration.

In my case, the source data didn't have a label, but I wanted to set a default label so the Drupal 8 site could display that as the clickable link (instead of an ugly long URL). To do that, it's similar to migrating a formatted text field, where you can migrate individual components of the field using the syntax [field_name]/[component]. In a Link field's case, it looks like:

Poor Man's XHProf profiling of Drupal 8 Migrations and Drush commands

On a recent project, there was a Migration run that took a very long time, and I couldn't pinpoint why; there were multiple migrations, and none of the others took very long at all (usually processing at least hundreds if not thousands of nodes per minute). In Drupal 7, if you enabled the XHProf module, then you'd get a checkbox on the configuration page that would turn on profiling for all page requests and Drush commands.

In Drupal 8, the XHProf module was completely rewritten, and as a side effect, the Drush/CLI profiling functionality is not yet present (see: Profile drush/CLI with XHProf in Drupal 8).

Since I don't have the time right now to help figure out how to get things working through the official XHProf module, I decided to use a 'poor man's profiling' method to profile a Migration run:

Getting Emoji and multibyte characters on your Drupal 7 site with 7.50

Almost exactly a year ago, I wrote a blog post titled Solving the Emoji/character encoding problem in Drupal 7.

Since writing that post, Drupal 7 bugfixes and improvements have started to pick up steam as (a) many members of the community who were focused on launching Drupal 8 had time to take a breather and fix up some long-standing Drupal 7 bugs and improvements that hadn't yet been backported, and (b) there are two new D7 core maintainers. One of the patches I've been applying to many sites and hoping would get pulled into core for a long time was adding support for full UTF-8, which allows the entry of emojis, Asian symbols, and mathematical symbols that would break Drupal 7 sites running on MySQL previously.

My old blog post had a few steps that you could follow to make your Drupal 7 site 'mostly' support UTF-8, but there were some rough edges. Now that support is in core, the process for converting your existing site's database is more straightforward:

I hit inbox zero!

It's been over three years since the last time I completely drained my main inbox, and reached #inboxzero.

I've been hitting my inbox hard for the past year now, constantly fighting to get it down to < 50 emails... but every time I hit a holiday weekend, worked on a larger home project, or did something like publish a new project, the inbox would start flooding a bit more. I finally made it my goal this year to purge the emails and hit zero messages by the end of the July 4th weekend—and it worked!

Inbox Zero - July 4 2016

Here are a few things I've been doing this year to try to keep the volume down even further (ironically, the closer I've gotten to zero, the more daily emails I get—now up to about 120/day non-spam):

Raspberry Pi (or another device) suddenly not getting a DHCP address?

Tonight, after I made a couple changes to my wired in-house Gigabit network (I recently added a few Cat6 runs after moving my main Wireless router—in this case an AirPort Extreme base station), I noticed the Raspberry Pi webserver that was hosting www.pidramble.com wasn't reachable over the network, and Server Check.in started reporting an outage.

I have that particular device set using a DHCP Reservation based on it's MAC address, and it's been working like a champ for over a year. So something was strange, since I hadn't made any networking configuration changes on the Pi itself in a few months, nor had I unplugged it at all in the past month.

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