community

Notes from the AnsibleFest Atlanta 2019 Ansible Contributor Summit

This is the third Ansible Contributor Summit I've attended, and the one with by far the most attendees. Contributor Summit is an Ansible community-focused day spent giving Ansible contributors updates on the current status and direction of the Ansible project, as well as an open mic to give feedback to the Ansible core team and other Ansible component teams.

As I have in the past, I thought I'd jot down a few notes from the Summit, with things I learned during the day, for the benefit of those who couldn't attend remotely, or don't have the time to watch all the meeting recordings (see a recap here).

Things I learned at the AnsibleFest Austin 2018 Contributor's Summit

AnsibleFest Austin 2018 is about to get started (with a huge party tonight, then a keynote to kick off two full days of sessions tomorrow), and the day before and after the 'Fest marks the 6th "Contributor's Summit", a "working session with the core team and key contributors to discuss important issues affecting the Ansible community".

AnsibleFest 2018 Austin Contributors Summit

As with most conference-related events, the best part of the day is getting to meet with and talk to people you work with online, but there are also usually lots of little tidbits discussed during the sessions which aren't yet widely known. Some of the most exciting things I learned today include:

Drupal's Contrib floodgates are open, PAReview your projects in Drupal VM!

Last week, the proverbial floodgates were opened when Drupal.org finally opened access to any registered user to create a 'full' Drupal.org project (theme, module, or profile). See the Project Applications Process Revamp issue on Drupal.org for more details.

Drupal.org modules page
You can now contribute full Drupal projects even if you're new to the community!

Honeypot for Drupal 8, 3 years in the making

Almost three years ago, on Feb 19, 2013, I opened the 8.x-dev branch of the Honeypot module (which helps prevent form spam on thousands of Drupal sites). These were heady times in the lifetime of the then-Drupal 8.x branch; 8.0-alpha1 wasn't released until three months later, on May 19. I made the #D8CX pledge—when Drupal 8 was released, I'd make sure there was a full, stable Honeypot release ready to go.

Little did I know it would be more than 2.5 years—and counting—before I could see that promise through to fruition!

As months turned into years, I've kept to the pledge, and eventually decided to also port a couple other modules that I use on many of my own Drupal sites, like Wysiwyg Linebreaks and Simple Mail.

Need to evaluate a Drupal module, theme, or distro quickly? [Updated]

...there's a site for that.

Simply Test.me Screenshot

I just found out about SimplyTest.me today, and it allows you to, well, simply test any Drupal.org-hosted module, theme, or distribution in seconds.

No longer do you need to spin up (or maintain) a live website locally (which usually takes an extra minute or two—at least) just to check out a module or make sure a theme or distribution fits your needs before using it on a live or development site.

Instead of simply getting a screen shot or trying a theme on a demo site, you get a full Drupal website set up and configured with the module/theme/distro (as well as it's dependencies), so you can play with it to your heart's content (for 30 minutes if you don't have an account on the site, an hour if you do).

PSR-0 PSR-1 PSR-2, Drupal, and You!

For the past couple years, discussions about 'PSR-0', PHP standards, and some sort of framework standardizations have been popping up here and there. It wasn't until a bunch of 'PSR-0 Interoperability' patches started popping up in the Drupal core issue queues that I decided to take a closer look at PSR. (The latest? PSR-1 (Basic Coding Standard) and PSR-2 (Coding Style Guide) have been accepted).

All the Hubbub About Drupal 7

Drupal 7. Is it ready?

That seems to be the general question in the air over the past few weeks discussed by many in the community. There's a problem with this question, though... I think many people look at their particular use cases, determine Drupal 7 to not (yet) be a good fit, then declare all things Drupal 7 to be lacking.

Really, though, are things so bad? I've seen hundreds of sites on Drupal Gardens that are beautiful and functional. I've upgraded two of my simpler Drupal 6 sites to Drupal 7. I've built a total of fifteen Drupal 7 sites—some serving more than 10,000 visitors a day, others serving a hundred or two (and almost all on shared hosting!)—and am working on three others. So, for me, the question 'Is Drupal 7 ready for prime-time?' doesn't make sense. It's already there (I haven't started a new project on Drupal 6 for six months now).

Scaling the Drupal Community - Notes and Reflections

The sparsely-attended 'Scaling the Drupal Community' session, led by webchick and heyrocker, was one of the few sessions I've attended at DrupalCon Chicago that held my interest throughout. And, since a few people on IRC asked me to post my session notes, I thought I'd do so and put them up on the Planet.

If you, like me, thought there were too many awesome sessions during this timeslot that you decided to go to another one, then this post is for you—I believe that anyone invested in Drupal's future stands to gain something from reflecting on what webchick said at the session.

Now, on to the notes. I will give a summary of a statement by webchick, then my reflection (kind of a Q&A format):

On 'Drupal Answers' vs. a drupal.org solution for Drupal Support

Drupal Answers is a new Stack Exchange site for answering Drupal questions, and it's in public beta right now. The site is hosted off the 'drupal.org' family of sites, and has a few hundred users so far...

Webchick: Webchick basically stated that she's leaning towards what we already have (with slight adjustments). She mentioned that there's no good answer for the question of motivating people to help support drupal newbies without incentives (a karma or reputation system).

Also, she said that moving the support away from drupal.org is potentially very dangerous; this could lead the 'newbie' community away from the 'expert' community (which tends to discuss things in drupal.org issue queues. Right now, 'newbies' typically hang around in drupal.org forums, and 'experts' typically stick to their trackers and issue queues.

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