youtube

10,000 Kubernetes Pods for 10,000 Subscribers

It started with a tweet, how did it end up like this?

I've had a YouTube channel since 2006—back when YouTube was a plucky upstart battling against Google Video (not Google Videos) and Vimeo. I started livestreaming a couple months ago on a whim, and since that time I've gained more subscribers than I had gained between 2006-2020!

So it seems fitting that I find some nerdy way to celebrate. After all, if Coline Furze can celebrate his milestones with ridiculous fireworks displays, I can do ... something?

Raspberry Pi Cluster Episode 2 - Setting up the Cluster

This post is based on one of the videos in my series on Raspberry Pi Clustering, and I'm posting the video + transcript to my blog so you can follow along even if you don't enjoy sitting through a video :)

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In the first episode, I talked about how and why I build Raspberry Pi clusters.

I mentioned my Raspberry Pi Dramble cluster, and how it's evolved over the past five years.

End of April - #DrupalCares pledge matched, $3000 total raised!

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At the beginning of April, the Drupal Association announced a new #DrupalCares campaign to secure funding to keep the Association's lights on after DrupalCon Minneapolis was mothballed due to certain global events.

Very quickly, many in the Drupal community stepped up, increasing contributions, making one-time donations, or even pledging a generous 2-for-1 match. I decided to pledge $1 for every like on this video, and as of today, it had over 800 likes!

Raspberry Pi Cluster Episode 1 - Introduction to Clusters

I will be posting a few videos discussing cluster computing with the Raspberry Pi in the next few weeks, and I'm going to post the video + transcript to my blog so you can follow along even if you don't enjoy sitting through a video :)

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This is a Raspberry Pi Compute Module.

7 Raspberry Pi Compute Modules in a stack

And this is a stack of 7 Raspberry Pi Compute Modules.

Donating $1 per like (matched to $3) to the Drupal Association

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Like many of you, my life has changed because of open source software. Drupal, in particular, is the first open source project I became deeply involved in, and my income from Drupal work has supported my family for years.

I've attended local Drupal Camps, many DrupalCons, and even worked for a few great Drupal companies. The Drupal Association has been a major part of sustaining the Drupal community for many years, and due to COVID-19, they're struggling financially this year.

They rely heavily on DrupalCon revenue, and they use those funds to maintain and grow drupal.org, market Drupal, and support community events.

How I livestream with OBS, a Sony a6000, and a Cam Link

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A few weeks before this year's pandemic started affecting the US, I started live-streaming on my YouTube channel.

In the past, I've helped run live streams for various events, from liturgies in a cathedral to youth events in a stadium. (I even wrote a blog post on the topic a few weeks ago.)

For larger events, there was usually a team of camera operators. We also had remote control 'PTZ' cameras, and dedicated streaming hardware like a Tricaster.

For my own livestreams, I had a very limited budget, and only one person (me) to operate the camera, produce the live stream, and be the content on the live stream!

Ansible 101 by Jeff Geerling - YouTube streaming series

Ansible 101 Header Image

After the incredible response I got from making my Ansible books free for the rest of March to help people learn new automation skills, I tried to think of some other things I could do to help developers who may be experiencing hardship during the coronavirus pandemic and market upheaval.

So I asked on Twitter:

How to livestream Masses or other liturgies on YouTube

Note: I also posted a video with more information and a demonstration of how I live stream.

I've been working on video streaming on a tight budget for years, and have scrambled to get live-streaming going for some liturgies on short notice, so I figured I'd put together a video showing a few options from 'cheap using what you already have' to 'a little more expensive but within a reasonable budget'. Note that if you plan on having regular video streams for the long term, it's better to invest in a proper streaming system with remote-controlled PTZ cameras and hard-wired connections.

All of the options in this post will require at least a smartphone or computer (laptop preferred) with a good WiFi connection. Ideally, you can also plug your phone or laptop into power so the battery doesn't run out in the middle of the stream

Migrating JeffGeerling.com from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 - How-to video series

Drupal 8 Live migration YouTube series image for JeffGeerling.com

This website is currently (as of February 2020) running on Drupal 7. Drupal 8 was released in November 2015—half a decade ago. Drupal 7 support has been extremely long-lived, as it will not be end-of-life'd until November 2021. As with all software, once it is out of date, and security patches are no longer provided, it becomes harder to ensure the software is secure, much less running well on the latest servers and PHP versions!

Therefore, I decided it was time to start migrating JeffGeerling.com to Drupal 8. And I figured instead of fumbling through the process all by myself, and maybe posting a couple blog posts about the process at the end, I'd adopt a new mantra: Let's fail together! (Just kidding—sorta.)

Migrating JeffGeerling.com to Drupal 8 — LIVE!

tl;dr: Subscribe to my YouTube Channel; I'm going to start migrating this website to Drupal 8 on a livestream every Tuesday at 10 a.m. US Central (3 p.m. UTC).

Ever since Drupal 8 was released, I've been waffling on the decision to migrate/upgrade this website (JeffGeerling.com) to Drupal 8. The site started off years ago as a static HTML site generated by Thingamablog, a really old Java-based static blog generator.

In the years since, I migrated from Thingamablog to Drupal 6, and from Drupal 6 to Drupal 7. Each of these migrations also incorporated a complete redesign, and I did another semi-redesign halfway through the Drupal 7 lifecycle, to the design you see today:

JeffGeerling.com - dark mode in 2020 in Drupal 7
Dark mode ftw!