networking

Share a Proxied Network Connection via WiFi to your iPad/iPhone/iPod

For the past six weeks that I've had my iPad, I've fought with my office network, because it uses a Microsoft/NTLM authenticated proxy server which wreaks havoc on the iPhone OS's ability to use the Internet effectively (especially for third party apps).

After reading through countless forum support requests for people asking the same questions, I've finally found a (mostly) workable solution for this problem—at least for most apps and browsing on the iPad.

Doubling the Proxy

Since the iPhone OS seems to have a pretty hard time dealing with proxy authentication (most apps don't act like there's even an internet connection, even if Safari will work through the proxy), I used a solution I often use on my Macs at work: doubling up the proxy.

Basically, you can use an application like Authoxy on the Mac to make the Mac translate all its web traffic through a special internal connection, which gets messaged correctly by Authoxy to work with your company's proxy server.

SSH in a Locked-Down Network

Recently, during one job for a client, I needed to work for a length of time in a location that had quite severe network restrictions—in addition to a proxy server, the location blocked every port besides 80, 25, 443, and 8080. In order to use secure shell (SSH) to login to my work web server, I needed to use one of those ports (I used nmap to find open ports on my end).

Luckily, I gained access to another network for a short time, and used that connection to update my work web server to allow SSH over port 8080 (in addition to the standard, port 22). I edited the /etc/ssh/sshd_config file so it reads:

Port 22
Port 8080

(the Port 22 line was commented out, originally).

Then I simply used the -p (port) directive when logging in via SSH:

$ ssh -p8080 [email protected]