github

Patching or using a forked version of an Ansible Galaxy role

I maintain a lot of Ansible Galaxy roles. I probably have a problem, but I won't admit it, so I'll probably keep adding more roles :)

One thing I see quite often is someone submitting a simple Pull Request for one of my roles on GitHub, then checking in here and there asking if I have had a chance to merge it yet. I'm guessing people who end up doing this might not know about one of the best features of Ansible Galaxy (and more generally, open source!): you can fork the role and maintain your changes in the fork, and it's pretty easy to do.

I just had to do it for one project I'm working on. I am using the rvm_io.ruby role to install specific versions of Ruby on some servers. But there seems to have been a breaking change to the upstream packages RVM uses, summarized in this GitHub issue. I found a pretty simple fix (removing one array item from a variable), and submitted this PR.

Git gives 'ERROR: Repository not found.' when URL is correct and SSH key is used

I had a fun problem that made me spin my wheels an hour or so today. I was having no issue cloning a remote repository a number of times in the morning while debugging a Jenkins build job that runs a git clone + Docker image build and push operation.

Suddenly, when I was doing some final testing, I started to get the following:

git clone git@github.com:geerlingguy/my-project.git                            
Cloning into 'my-project'...
ERROR: Repository not found.
fatal: Could not read from remote repository.

Please make sure you have the correct access rights
and the repository exists.

I know that I had the repository's SSH key loaded (via eval "$(ssh-agent -s)" && ssh-add ~/.ssh/deploy-key), and if I unloaded the key, I would instead get:

Cloning private GitHub repositories with Ansible on a remote server through SSH

One of Ansible's strengths is the fact that its 'agentless' architecture uses SSH for control of remote servers. And one classic problem in remote Git administration is authentication; if you're cloning a private Git repository that requires authentication, how can you do this while also protecting your own private SSH key (by not copying it to the remote server)?

As an example, here's a task that clones a private repository to a particular folder:

- name: Clone a private repository into /opt.
  git:
    repo: git@github.com:geerlingguy/private-repo.git
    version: master
    dest: /opt/private-repo
    accept_hostkey: yes
  # ssh-agent doesn't allow key to pass through remote sudo commands.
  become: no

If you run this task, you'll probably end up with something like:

Why I close PRs (OSS project maintainer notes)

GitHub project notifications geerlingguy/drupal-vm PRs

I maintain many open source projects on GitHub and elsewhere (over 160 as of this writing). I have merged and/or closed thousands of Pull Requests (PRs) and patches in the past few years, and would like to summarize here many of the reasons I don't merge many PRs.

A few of my projects have co-maintainers, but most are just me. The bus factor is low, but I offset that by granting very open licenses and encouraging forks. I also devote a set amount of time (averaging 5-10 hours/week) to my OSS project maintenance, and have a personal budget of around $1,000/year to devote to infrastructure to support my projects (that's more than most for-profit companies who use my projects devote to OSS, sadly).

How I test Ansible configuration on 7 different OSes with Docker

The following post is an excerpt from chapter 11 in my book Ansible for DevOps. The example used is an Ansible role that installs Java—since the role is supposed to work across CentOS 6 and 7, Fedora 24, Ubuntu 12.04, 14.04, and 16.04, and Debian 8, I use Docker to run an end-to-end functional test on each of those Linux distributions. See an example test run in Travis CI, and the Travis file that describes the build.

Note: I do the same thing currently (as of 2019), but now I'm using Molecule to tie everything together; see Testing your Ansible roles with Molecule.

Major improvements to Drupal VM - PHP 7, MariaDB, Multi-OS

Drupal VM - Vagrant and Ansible Virtual Machine for Drupal Development

For the past couple years, I've been building Drupal VM to be an extremely-tunable, highly-performant, super-simple development environment. Since MidCamp earlier this year, the project has really taken off, with almost 200 stars on GitHub and a ton of great contributions and ideas for improvement (some implemented, others rejected).

In the time since I wrote Developing for Drupal with Vagrant and VMs, I've focused on meeting all my defined criteria for the perfect local development environment. And now, I'm able to say that I use Drupal VM when developing all my projects—as it is now flexible and fast enough to emulate any production environment I use for various Drupal projects.

Testing Ansible Roles with Travis CI on GitHub

This post was originally written in 2014, using a technique that only easily allows testing on Ubuntu 12.04; since then, I've been adapting many of my roles (e.g. geerlingguy.apache) to use a Docker container-based testing approach, and I've written a new blog post that details the new technique: How I test Ansible configuration on 7 different OSes with Docker.

Since I'm now maintaining 37 roles on Ansible Galaxy, there's no way I can spend as much time reviewing every aspect of every role when doing maintenance, or checking out pull requests to improve the roles. Automated testing using a continuous integration tool like Travis CI (which is free for public projects and integrated very well with GitHub) allows me to run tests against my Ansible roles with every commit and be more assured nothing broke since the last commit.

Push your Git repositories to a central server, in a bare repository

GitHub is a great central repository silo for open source projects, and for private Git repositories for companies and organizations with enough cash to afford the features GitHub offers.

However, for many projects and developers, GitHub can be overkill. For my needs, I have many smaller private projects that I'd like to have hosted centrally, and backed up, but don't warrant BitBucket or GitHub accounts. Therefore, I've taken to creating bare repositories on one of my Linode servers, and pushing all my local branches and tags to these repos. That server is backed up nightly, so I know if I lose my local environment, as well as my Time Machine backup (a very unlikely occurrence, but still possible), I will have backed up and fully intact Git repos for all my projects.

I recommend you do something like the following (presuming you already have a Git repo on your local computer that you've been working with):

Android Map Marker Drawables/Icons - Original Vector Illustration

I've been looking around for a good set of Android map marker icons (drawables), and I've only seen a few that included a vector image (Illustrator or EPS graphics) so I could customize the icon however I wanted. So, I just created my own icon, saved five common colors to a set of xhdpi, hdpi, mdpi, and ldpi sizes, and posted them to a new repository on GitHub: Android Map Marker Drawables (icons).

Please see the GitHub repo for more information about the icons, how to use them, and for the original vector image. Here are examples of the icons (in hdpi resolution):