config

Adding Configuration Split to a Drupal site using BLT and Acquia Cloud

Note: As of Config Split beta4, you no longer need to use drush csex/csim to export and import config accounting for splits. You instead install both Config Filter and Config Split, then use the normal Drush commands (drush cex/cim). There are also a few other tweaks to the guide below; I may update it when I get more time.

I've been looking at a ton of different solutions to using Drupal 8's Configuration Management in a way that meets the following criteria:

Setting up the Edimax EW-7811Un or Tenda W311Mi 802.11b/g/n WiFi Adapter on a Raspberry Pi

Note: On Raspberry Pi models with built-in WiFi (e.g. the Raspberry Pi 3 model B), USB WiFi interfaces will use wlan1 (wlan0 is reserved for the first interface, in this case the internal one).

Since this is maybe the fourth time I've done this process on my Raspberry Pis, I decided to document the process of setting up cheap mini WiFi adapters on a Raspberry Pi A+/B+/2.

This process works great with any USB WiFi adapter that's supported out of the box. My three favorites (due to their inexpensive price and decent connection speed/reliability) are:

Apache Kerberos Authentication and basic authentication fallback

Many businesses and organizations use Active Directory or other LDAP-based authentication systems, and many web applications (like Drupal) can easily integrate with them for authentication and user account provisioning.

The Kerberos Module for Apache allows users to be automatically logged into your web application, by passing through their credentials behind the scenes. This makes for a seamless user experience—the user never needs to log into your web application if the user is authenticated on his local machine.

A standard configuration for Kerberos authentication inside your Apache configuration file looks like:

Setting a max_execution_time limit for PHP CLI

PHP's command line interface doesn't respect the max_execution_time limit within your php.ini settings. This can be both a blessing and a curse (but more often the latter). There are some drush scripts that I run concurrently for batch operations that I want to make sure don't run away from me, because they perform database operations and network calls, and can sometimes slow down and block other operations.

Memory usage - PHP and MySQL locked from runaway threads
Can you tell when the batch got backlogged? CPU usage spiked to 20, and threads went from 100 to 400.

I found that some large batch operations (where there are hundreds of thousands of items to work on) would hold the server hostage and cause a major slowdown, and when I went to the command line and ran:

$ drush @site-alias ev "print ini_get('max_execution_time');"

Checklist for Setting up a CentOS 6 LAMP Server

I have to set up a new LAMP server for different clients here and there, but not with enough frequency to warrant using a particular scripted solution or 'stack' from a particular hosting company. Plus, I like to have a portable solution that is flexible to the needs (and constraints) of a client's website.

Note on hosting providers: For hosting, I've used a very wide variety of hosts. I typically use and recommend Hot Drupal VPSes or Linode VPSes [affiliate link] running CentOS for a good LAMP server. Shared servers are only good for nonessential or low-traffic sites, but they are a bit cheaper and easier to use for simpler needs!

So, here's a typical step-by-step process for how I set up a CentOS 6 (similar process for CentOS 5) server for LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP), often for low-to-moderate Drupal sites (one or many):

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