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Set up a hierarchical taxonomy term Facet using Facet API with Search API Solr

I wanted to document this here just because it took me a little while to get all the bits working just right so I could have a hierarchical taxonomy display inside a Facet API search facet, rather than a flat display of only the taxonomy terms directly related to the nodes in the current search.

Basically, I had a search facet on a search page that allowed users to filter search results by a taxonomy term, and I wanted it to show the taxonomy's hierarchy:

Flat taxonomy to hierarchical taxonomy display using Search API Solr and Facet API in Drupal 7

To do this, you need to do two main things:

  1. Make sure your taxonomy field is being indexed with taxonomy hierarchy data intact.
  2. Set up the Facet API facet for this taxonomy term so it will display the full hierarchy.

Let's first start by making sure the taxonomy information is being indexed (refer to the image below):

Configuring CloudFlare with Drupal 8 to protect the Pi Dramble

In a prior post on the constraints of in-home website hosting, I mentioned one of the major hurdles to serving content quickly and reliably over a home Internet connection is the bandwidth you get from your ISP. I also mentioned one way to mitigate the risk of DoSing your own home Internet is to use a CDN and host images externally.

At this point, I have both of those things set up for www.pidramble.com (a Drupal 8 site hosted on a cluster of Raspberry Pis in my basement!), and I wanted to outline how I set up Drupal 8 and CloudFlare so almost all requests to www.pidramble.com are served through CloudFlare directly to the end user!

CloudFlare Configuration

Before anything else, you need a CloudFlare account; the free plan offers all the necessary features (though you should consider upgrading to a better plan if you have anything beyond the simplest use cases in mind!). Visit the CloudFlare Plans page and sign up for a Free account.

Drupal VM's latest update adds Redis, PHP-FPM support to Apache

tl;dr: Drupal VM 2.2.0 'Wormhole' was released today, and it adds even more features for local dev!

Over the past few months, I've been working towards a more reliable release cadence for Drupal VM, and I've targeted one or two large features, a number of small improvements, and as many bugfixes as I have time to review. The community surrounding Drupal VM's development has been amazing; in the past few months I've noticed:

Always getting X-Drupal-Cache: MISS? Check for messages

I spent about an hour yesterday debugging a Varnish page caching issue. I combed the site configuration and code for anything that might be setting cache to 0 (effectively disabling caching), I checked and re-checked the /admin/config/development/performance settings, verifying the 'Expiration of cached pages' (page_cache_maximum_age) had a non-zero value and that the 'Cache pages for anonymous users' checkbox was checked.

After scratching my head a while, I realized that the headers I was seeing when using curl --head [url] were specified as the defaults in drupal_page_header(), and were triggered any time there was a message displayed on the page (e.g. via drupal_set_message()):

X-Drupal-Cache: MISS
Expires: Sun, 19 Nov 1978 05:00:00 GMT
Cache-Control: no-cache, must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0
X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff

Benchmarking PHP 7 vs HHVM - Drupal and Wordpress

[Multiple updates: I've added results for concurrencies of 1 and 10, results on bare metal vs. VMware instances, tested Drupal 8 vs Drupal 7 vs Wordpress 4.4, and I've also retested every single benchmark at least twice! Please make sure you're read through the entire post prior to contesting these benchmark results!]

tl;dr: Always test your own application, and trust, but verify every benchmark you see. PHP 7 is actually faster than HHVM in many cases, neck-in-neck in others, and slightly slower in others. Both PHP 7 and HHVM blow PHP ≤ 5.6 out of the water.

Skip to benchmark results:

Drupal 8 with Redis, PHP 7, Nginx, and MariaDB on Drupal VM using CentOS

One of the motivations behind Drupal VM is flexibility in local development environments. When you develop many different kinds of Drupal sites you need to be able to adapt your environment to the needs of the site—some sites use Memcached and Varnish, others use Solr, and yet others cache data in Redis!

Drupal VM has recently gained much more flexibility in that it now allows configuration options like:

  • Choose either Ubuntu or CentOS as your operating system.
  • Choose either Nginx or Apahe as your webserver.
  • Choose either MySQL or MariaDB for your database.
  • Choose either Memcached or Redis as a caching layer.
  • Add on extra software like Apache Solr, Node.js, Ruby, Varnish, Xhprof, and more.

Out of the box, Drupal VM installs Drupal 8 on Ubuntu 14.04 with PHP 5.6 (the most stable release as of December 2015) and MySQL. We're going to make a few quick changes to config.yml so we can run the following local development stack on top of CentOS 7:

Drupal VM - Drupal 8 status report page showing Nginx, Redis, MariaDB, and PHP 7

Configure Drupal VM

To get started, download or clone a copy of Drupal VM, and follow the Quick Start Guide, but before you run vagrant up (step 2, #6), edit config.yml and make the following changes/additions:

Upgrade an Apache Solr Search index from 1.4 to 3.6 (and later versions)

Recently I had to upgrade someone's Apache Solr installation from 1.4 to 5.x (the current latest version), and for the most part, a Solr upgrade is straightforward, especially if you're doing it for a Drupal site that uses the Search API or Solr Search modules, as the solr configuration files are already upgraded for you (you just need to switch them out when you do the upgrade, making any necessary customizations).

However, I ran into the following error when I tried loading the core running Apache Solr 4.x or 5.x:

org.apache.solr.common.SolrException:org.apache.solr.common.SolrException: org.apache.lucene.index.IndexFormatTooOldException: Format version is not supported (resource: MMapIndexInput(path="/var/solr/cores/[corename]/data/spellchecker2/_1m.cfx") [slice=_1m.fdx]): 1 (needs to be between 2 and 3). This version of Lucene only supports indexes created with release 3.0 and later.

To fix this, you need to upgrade your index using Solr 3.5.0 or later, then you can upgrade to 4.x, then 5.x (using each version of Solr to upgrade from the previous major version):

Celebrate Drupal 8 in St. Louis, MO on Nov 19 - Food, Drinks, and a Raspberry Pi!

Drupal 8 Logo

On November 19, the St. Louis Drupal Users Group is having a party to celebrate the release of Drupal 8, which has been 4 years in the making! The party will be hosted at Spry Digital in downtown St. Louis, and will have beer provided by Manifest, food and drinks provided by Spry, and a Raspberry Pi 2 model B giveaway sponsored by Midwestern Mac!

Drupal 8.0.0 has been built by over 3,000 contributors in all corners of the globe, and will help kick off the next generation of personalized, content-driven websites. During the meetup, we'll build a brand new Drupal 8 site on the Raspberry Pi using Jeff Geerling's Drupal Pi project, and we'll highlight some of the awesome new features of Drupal 8.

Raspberry Pi and Acquia dancing man

After we build one of the first Drupal 8 sites, we'll give away the Raspberry Pi to a lucky winner to take home and tinker with! Special thanks to the Austin Drupal Users Group, who came up with the Pi giveaway idea!

We'll also eat, drink and be merry, celebrating the start of a new era of site building with the best version of Drupal yet!

If you'd like to join us, please RSVP on the STLDUG Meetup page: STLDUG Drupal 8.0.0 Release Party.

Drupal Pi project featured on Acquia Dev Center Blog

Acquia Raspberry Pi model 2 B

I recently wrote a post detailing how to set up Drupal 8 on a Raspberry Pi using the Drupal Pi project (the same setup which is currently powering www.pidramble.com!) on the Acquia Developer Center blog: Drupal and the Raspberry Pi.

Hopefully people will find more and more useful ways to use Drupal 8 on the Raspberry Pi for automation, for interactivity, and most of all for fun and experimentation!

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